Hulk Hogan is a gay?

Hulk (real name: Terry Bollea) tried to keep a sense of humor about the fracas while making a Saturday appearance at the Spike TV Video Game Awards in Culver City, Calif.

“After the four-year crazy divorce I thought I’d heard everything I could hear in the courtroom,” he told Us Weekly, laughing. “Then, all of a sudden she says I abused her, that I was violent. She told everybody that I was a homosexual.” (Linda leveled her claims in both a shocking memoir and interviews promoting the book.

Clarified Hogan about Linda’s charge that he had a sexual relationship with fellow wrestler Brutus Beefcake: “If any of that was true, I would admit it, and I was a homosexual I would embrace it. It’s just so crazy to hear, so I have a real problem with it….If you’re going to say I’m something that I’m not to try to ruin my career and my livelihood….I have to answer her back.”

Hogan, who shares daughter Brooke, 23, and son Nick, 21, with Linda, told Us he’s baffled by the situation.

What’s Out: the Fashion Trend

Prom DressesDavid Wolfe has been analyzing style trends for 41 years. But last week, Mr. Wolfe, creative director of the Doneger Group consultants, stood up in a room full of retail executives and told them: “There are no more trends. Everything is in style.”

Even as the fashion press gears up for an orgy of trend-spotting at New York fashion week, which starts Feb. 11, many observers feel Mr. Wolfe is right: We’ve reached the end of the trend as the guiding stricture in fashion. The “must-have” currently being attached to certain styles—The trench coat! The one-shoulder dress! Metallics!—is little more than a marketing pitch.

The trench coat and formal gowns has been “in” for the past five years, and will be hot next year, too. Indeed, it’s a safe bet that next month we’ll see every possible length of skirt, width of pant and cut of blouse walk the runways—sometimes all in the same show.

Rather than fuss about skirt lengths or the season’s silhouette, people now dress the way they see themselves, choosing looks that flatter their bodies and fit their lifestyles. Most of us dress with our social groups or professions, rather than fashion trends, using clothes to flash messages about who we are.

A chief executive in the tech business may don Gap chinos and a blazer for work, while investment banking chiefs remain loyal to their Zegna suits. Others dress according to the mores of their own personal tribes: If you don’t dress steampunk, you may not even know it’s a style (think 19th-century mad scientist in leather waistcoat with goggles and a pocket watch).

There was a time when luxury retailers Stanley Marcus and Andrew Goodman, of Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman, determined what women would buy each season. That was back when nerds weren’t cool and, for some reason, a lady’s coat had to be longer than her skirt. Women who wanted to be fashionable bought the fashions whether they wanted to wear miniskirts or not. Though fashions changed, the primacy of trends didn’t: Until just a few years ago, no self-respecting teenager would have been caught in the wrong denim wash. Part of the fun of watching old movies was seeing the funny old fashions.

Now, most old film fashions look pretty current to me, from Katharine Hepburn’s swishy man-tailored pants in 1940’s “Philadelphia Story” to those skinny ski-lodge capris in 1963’s “The Pink Panther.”

“Trends are diluted,” says Doris Raymond, owner of the Los Angeles vintage store The Way We Wore. That’s because designers have in the past two decades “referenced every possible fashion period for inspiration.”

The style consensus has been splintering for nearly a decade as workplaces have grown more casual and fields like tech have pursued their own tribal dress codes. Meanwhile, young celebrities have championed a mix-and-match aesthetic. “The industry is fragmenting, reflecting consumers’ desire to create their own style,” says Marie Driscoll, director of consumer discretionary retail coverage for Standard & Poor’s equity research.

Retailers like Zara, H&M and Forever 21 have contributed to “fast fashion,” gobbling their way through looks. Last week in New York, H&M sale racks displayed blurry-print floral blouses based on designer looks that were shown on the runways in September. When those designers’ own clothes arrive in stores in March, H&M customers may well view the originals with déjà vu. Runway looks are now accessible to everyone—but their cachet disappears a lot faster.

I welcome democratic fashion as one of the many benefits of being alive in 2010. But it can be a headache for the fashion industry, which once could depend on trends to lure customers and still maintains a trend-spotting infrastructure to figure out who will buy what. Predicting trends is “more challenging every year,” says Sharon Graubard, a trend analyst with fashion consultancy Stylesight. “With fewer ‘must-have’ items, retailers and designers have to try harder,” she says.

Some new retailers are letting customers dictate the details. “Fashion has traditionally been this top-down industry, but we saw that technology” could allow consumers to choose their own details, says Abby Holtz, director of marketing for indiCustom, a San Francisco retailer of custom jeans and shirts that launched in 2008. Its IndiDenim brand lets shoppers pick fabric, leg shape, pockets and other details for customized jeans.

But there’s one fashion segment where trend is increasingly dominant: menswear, where pleats are “out” and trim, flat-front pants are “in,” says Andy Gilchrist, author of “The Encyclopedia of Men’s Clothes” and founder of the “Ask Andy” Web site. “It seems,” he says, “that the designers and retailers are trying to get men into that ‘old’ women’s fashion trend cycle.”

Corey Haim died in drug overdose

Corey Haim was broke and caring for his mother, who was battling breast cancer, when he collapsed just after midnight Wednesday after complaining of labored breathing, People.com reports. Haim’s agent Mark Heaslip says Corey Haim, the “Lost Boys” star whose career stalled while his drug use spiraled out of control, had been with his mother during all of her doctor’s appointments but fell ill with flu-like symptoms in the last few days. Judy Haim called 911 early Wednesday. He was declared dead at the hospital.

“She is taking this very, very hard,” Heaslip says. “This is all shocking.”

Meanwhile, Haim’s pal Corey Feldman tells Larry King that he wants people to stop jumping to conclusions that Haim died from a drug overdose. “They need to stop saying, you know, their theories of what they think it is or isn’t. Because at the end of the day, until the coroner’s report comes out, until we have specific evidence, until we know exactly what the toxicology reports say, nobody knows.”

He says he last spoke to Haim a few days before his death, and that the actor was “honestly in the best frame of mind that he’s ever been in in the past year.” He says Haim’s mother’s illness made Haim finally grow up.

He also took Hollywood to task for discarding its child stars. “We build people up as children, we put them on pedestals and then when we decide that they’re not marketable anymore, we walk away from them,” he says. “And then we taunt them and we tease them … Why is it OK to kick somebody when they’re down?”

The Story of the Stuff

The Story of Stuff, made by Annie Leonard, is a short clip about the current situation the world is going through when it comes to the concept of consumerism. Annie starts The Story of Stuff off with defining the process which consumption follows as she starts off with the process of ‘extraction’ which she believes is just a more elegant word for exploiting natural resources. The Story of Stuff animation has a total run time of twenty minutes and has surprised the viewers with how much she has explained in just twenty minutes.

The Story of Stuff has now come out as an audio book which is available online from the sites of Amazon, iTunes, Audible.com and Barnes and Noble, it was released on the internet on the ninth of March and has been read by the author herself, Annie Leonard. The Story of Stuff touches some very important factors which have lead to the decline of national happiness and an almost exponential increment to the toxins that we release into our closed environment.

In The Story of Stuff she talks about how just a few decades ago the average American citizen consumed half as much as he or she did today and she blames this on the strategy that the government has promoted since the fifties which was to create a maximum amount of consumer goods and market them in such a way that the inventory is always on the move. The Story of Stuff book was released after the author was asked by thousands of people to give more details about the short animation that she had come out with.

Sandra Bullock Oscar award acceptance speech

An Oscar acceptance speech last night by Sandra Bullock was one of the best by 45-year-old actress while at the 82nd Annual Academy Awards. Her portrayal of famous Leigh Ann Tuohy in ‘The Blind Side’ enabled Sandra Bullock take home an Oscar in the category of Best Actress.

Actors Steve Martin and Alec Baldwin took stage to start the proceedings at Kodak Theater Hollywood and the Los Angeles California crowds welcomed the duo with wonderful round of applaud. The night observed various Hollywood stars both males and females receiving their Oscars and delivering their respective acceptance speeches.

The big winner of the night was none other than the daughter of an Alabama-German couple 45 years of age Sandra Annettee Bullock. Her father John W. Bullock is from Alabama whereas Helga D. Meyer an opera singer belongs to Germany. Born in Arlington, Virginia Sandra Bullock graced the red carpet on March 7, 2010 wearing a magnificent silver gown when she took stage to receive the honor.

Ever-witty and funny Sandra brought smiles on the faces of everyone present on the graceful occasion even with her opening sentence when she stated: “Did I finally wear all of you down, or did I really earn the Award deservingly?” However, by all means, it was best among the evening’s acceptance speeches, indeed.

She expressed due praise for the fellow nominees and then taking advantage of the opportunity, she also amused the audiences by a lighthearted jab she had at Meryl Streep sitting at a distance of few feet, titled Streep as her ‘lover’ and ‘great kisser.’ The reference she made was a January 2010 incident at Critics’ Choice Awards whereby Bullock had Meryl Streep in a lip-lock and the kiss got lot of media attention lately.

To continue with her speech, Sandra stated “I thank all the good and all the mean people to me such as George Clooney who kind drowned me in a pool some times in past’ and that ‘I still have a grudge about the same.” Then she talked further and in a serious tone stated that she would like to thank ‘The Blind Side’ and especially her mother for making her learn there’s no religion, class system and no race or no color etc.

The Hills have thighs movie trailer

The Internet is a funny thing. A global information network powered by we, the people, the popularity of different topics is largely determined by what people are searching for. So when an unusual search term comes up among the most popular, we try to understand exactly what people are looking for.

Such is the case with “The Hills Have Thighs,” which a lot of you seem to be looking for info on this morning. It’s a 2008 “Appalachian comedy” from writer/director/actor James Bubba Cromer, or Coach Cromer (as it says in the trailer). I can’t quite figure out just why it’s so popular this morning; if anyone knows, please share in the comments section below or @MTVMoviesBlog on Twitter. You can find more info about the movie here and you can check out the wacky trailer below.