Hulk Hogan is a gay?

Hulk (real name: Terry Bollea) tried to keep a sense of humor about the fracas while making a Saturday appearance at the Spike TV Video Game Awards in Culver City, Calif.

“After the four-year crazy divorce I thought I’d heard everything I could hear in the courtroom,” he told Us Weekly, laughing. “Then, all of a sudden she says I abused her, that I was violent. She told everybody that I was a homosexual.” (Linda leveled her claims in both a shocking memoir and interviews promoting the book.

Clarified Hogan about Linda’s charge that he had a sexual relationship with fellow wrestler Brutus Beefcake: “If any of that was true, I would admit it, and I was a homosexual I would embrace it. It’s just so crazy to hear, so I have a real problem with it….If you’re going to say I’m something that I’m not to try to ruin my career and my livelihood….I have to answer her back.”

Hogan, who shares daughter Brooke, 23, and son Nick, 21, with Linda, told Us he’s baffled by the situation.

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Baby Gifts for 2011 The Best of The Best!

The best baby gifts are those that are given by a thoughtful friend or family member. It’s not hard to find wonderful baby gift ideas. Think about what the mom may need right after the baby arrives and also what they both may need in the future or what the baby would enjoy and play with.

Just be creative and take your time choosing your gift. A thoughtful gift, makes this a special time for everyone to remember. Babies love presents! The pure joy when they get the gift open and the smile they get when they play with it. We have selected baby gifts that really stand out from the pack for their quality, entertainment and educational value. We’ve assembled the most popular and highest rated baby products and we are featuring them in this baby gifts guide for you to consider when choosing your unique gift.

What are the top baby gifts for 2011? In addition to great shopping, this page has a cool interactive visitor poll with a quest to determine The Top Baby Gifts for 2011 These gifts will definitely have a baby smiling, and a parent applauding as well.

 

 

America’s 3 Richest Zip Codes as of 2011

No. 1 Richest Zip Code: 33480
Location: Palm Beach, Fla.

No. households: 5,505*
Pct. change in no. households since 2000: 13.76*
Average household income: $370,136
Average household net worth: $1,486,123

The town of Palm Beach—in America’s richest Zip Code, 33480—is a 16-mile barrier island with the Atlantic Ocean on its eastern boundary and Lake Worth on the west. High-end shopping and dining establishments can be found on Worth Avenue, and the island provides polo, golf, tennis, yachting, and deep-sea fishing, according to Sotheby’s International Realty. The predominant group is executives and professionals in their 40s and 50s with no children. The median age, according to 2010 census data, was 67.5.

No. 2 Richest Zip Code: 11568
Location: Old Westbury, N.Y.

No. households: 1,047
Pct. change in no. households since 2000: 8.61
Average household income: $282,981
Average household net worth: $1,547,866

On Long Island’s north shore, about 25 miles from Manhattan, Old Westbury is New York’s most affluent suburb, according to Gadberry Group. It is home to the Meadowbrook Polo Club, the country’s oldest polo field, and Old Westbury Gardens, built in 1906. The predominant group is elite couples and singles.

No. 3 Richest Zip Code: 60043
Location: Kenilworth, Ill.

No. households: 810
Pct. change in no. households since 2000: 1.00
Average household income: $323,588
Average household net worth: $1,558,833

 

 

No. 1 Richest Zip Code: 33480
Location: Palm Beach, Fla.

No. households: 5,505*
Pct. change in no. households since 2000: 13.76*
Average household income: $370,136
Average household net worth: $1,486,123

The town of Palm Beach—in America’s richest Zip Code, 33480—is a 16-mile barrier island with the Atlantic Ocean on its eastern boundary and Lake Worth on the west. High-end shopping and dining establishments can be found on Worth Avenue, and the island provides polo, golf, tennis, yachting, and deep-sea fishing, according to Sotheby’s International Realty. The predominant group is executives and professionals in their 40s and 50s with no children. The median age, according to 2010 census data, was 67.5.

No. 2 Richest Zip Code: 11568
Location: Old Westbury, N.Y.

No. households: 1,047
Pct. change in no. households since 2000: 8.61
Average household income: $282,981
Average household net worth: $1,547,866

On Long Island’s north shore, about 25 miles from Manhattan, Old Westbury is New York’s most affluent suburb, according to Gadberry Group. It is home to the Meadowbrook Polo Club, the country’s oldest polo field, and Old Westbury Gardens, built in 1906. The predominant group is elite couples and singles.

No. 3 Richest Zip Code: 60043
Location: Kenilworth, Ill.

No. households: 810
Pct. change in no. households since 2000: 1.00
Average household income: $323,588
Average household net worth: $1,558,833

The village of Kenilworth, about 17 miles from downtown Chicago and south of 60093, the No. 14 richest Zip Code, is the wealthiest area in the Midwest, according to Gadberry’s analysis. The average household income in this exclusive North Shore suburb is $323,588. Elite couples and singles are the predominant residents.

 

Leahy: Breast reconstruction is more than cosmetic

Cosmetic breast surgery has gotten something of a bad rap over the years. The idea of “having some work done” on the breasts may actually be keeping many women who might benefit from breast reconstructive surgery from considering it.
Each year, more than 254,000 American women battle breast cancer. But according to a new study, less than one-fifth of women who undergo mastectomy currently choose to have breast reconstruction.

A stigma equating elective cosmetic surgery with reconstructive surgery is partially to blame, along with a woman’s hesitation to put herself first. There are also lingering perceptions that surgery can affect the chances of cancer returning, when in fact studies exist, including high volume studies in literature, that indicate that reconstructive surgeries have been shown to increase a patient’s survival rate and quality of life.

The American Society of Plastic Surgeons is more optimistic, estimating that 93,000 women in America underwent breast reconstruction following mastectomies last year, an increase of nearly 20 percent from a decade ago.

The study’s author urges the medical community to educate patients about reconstructive surgery before mastectomies and other surgeries are performed to help them make a well-informed decision, which is now law in New York, and the vision statement of the National Breast Reconstruction Awareness Day.

In reconstruction surgery, plastic surgeons can help re-create lost breast tissue from mastectomy through a variety of treatment options. The fact that the patient has options and choices at this stage of treatment is one major reason why plastic surgeons enjoy working with these patients.

Options range from simple to more complex, depending upon the situation. One option is NOT to have reconstruction. I believe all patients should at least have the benefit of meeting with a surgeon to discuss their cases. I sometimes utilize a breast implant to re-create the lost volume, and other times I borrow the patient’s own tissues to do the job. This would be followed down the road by nipple and areolar reconstruction to help the woman feel better about herself moving forward.

Sometimes women are born with deformities of the breasts that lead to small or distorted growth of the tissues, often only on one side. This leads to similar problems mentioned above, and especially feelings of self-consciousness during the teenage years and early 20s. These conditions can also be greatly improved by plastic surgery.

While I may not be able to hit a particular cup size, owing to differences in design and manufacturing, the goal is to provide a natural appearance to the breast that is symmetric and balances the rest of the patient’s figure as well.

Plastic surgeons take the initial consultation with patients considering breast procedures very seriously. We encourage patients to bring a friend or family member to help ask questions and to remember the information. Plan to take some time on your first visit, so you can talk with your surgeon in a relaxed fashion. I try to provide as much detail as the patient is interested in hearing, focusing on the goals and expectations of the procedure, recovery and potential complications that can develop.

For cases covered by third-party insurance companies (breast reduction/reconstruction), there may be other steps that are required in terms of documentation. Make sure your surgeon’s office is aware of these nuances and can help negotiate this process.

The final results of breast reconstruction following mastectomy can help lessen the physical and emotional impact of mastectomy.

There are trade-offs. In some situations, it may not be possible to achieve optimal results with a single surgical procedure, so another surgery may be necessary. But most women feel these are small compared to the large improvement in their quality of life and the ability to look and feel whole again.

Know more about this article from examiner.net

WISH LIST of a Shoplifter

Exactly what are people stealing? Here is the top 10 most shoplifted items of 2011 and they’re truly bizarre.

1. Filet mignon

So many people are tucking choice cuts of meats under their jackets that supermarkets are now considered the stores with the most theft.

2. Jameson

Those with an unquenchable thirst for booze just help themselves to a free bottle of expensive liquor.

3. Electric tools
Apparently the the most common items men nab are electric toothbrushes and power tools. At least they’re fighting cavities.

4. iPhone 4
Electronics like smartphones and video games are high risk items, and one research group claims 100,000 laptops are stolen annually from big box stores.

5. Gillette Mach 4

Anyone who uses non-disposable razors knows they’re pretty expensive, so in tough financial times people don’t want to pay for them anymore.

6. Axe
The men’s deodorant and body wash we love to hate are often stolen in mass quantities and resold at flea markets and corner stores. Dial is popular amongst thieves too.

7. Polo Ralph Lauren
Clothing theft is up 31 percent since 2009. It’s hard to look good in a bad economy, so some score fresh threads the illegal way.

8. Let’s Rock Elmo
The Sesame Street toy topped the Toys’R’Us “Hot Toys” list this year, so parents are stealing this must-have toy for their kids if they can’t afford it.

9. Chanel No. 5

Who wouldn’t love a bottle of this popular woman’s fragrance? Expensive perfumes make up nearly four percent of loss in stores that carry them.

10. Nikes

Some shoppers wear flip-flops into a store, try on a pair of sneakers, and walk out wearing them. Sneaker heads will do whatever it takes to score the kicks on their wish list.

What’s Out: the Fashion Trend

Prom DressesDavid Wolfe has been analyzing style trends for 41 years. But last week, Mr. Wolfe, creative director of the Doneger Group consultants, stood up in a room full of retail executives and told them: “There are no more trends. Everything is in style.”

Even as the fashion press gears up for an orgy of trend-spotting at New York fashion week, which starts Feb. 11, many observers feel Mr. Wolfe is right: We’ve reached the end of the trend as the guiding stricture in fashion. The “must-have” currently being attached to certain styles—The trench coat! The one-shoulder dress! Metallics!—is little more than a marketing pitch.

The trench coat and formal gowns has been “in” for the past five years, and will be hot next year, too. Indeed, it’s a safe bet that next month we’ll see every possible length of skirt, width of pant and cut of blouse walk the runways—sometimes all in the same show.

Rather than fuss about skirt lengths or the season’s silhouette, people now dress the way they see themselves, choosing looks that flatter their bodies and fit their lifestyles. Most of us dress with our social groups or professions, rather than fashion trends, using clothes to flash messages about who we are.

A chief executive in the tech business may don Gap chinos and a blazer for work, while investment banking chiefs remain loyal to their Zegna suits. Others dress according to the mores of their own personal tribes: If you don’t dress steampunk, you may not even know it’s a style (think 19th-century mad scientist in leather waistcoat with goggles and a pocket watch).

There was a time when luxury retailers Stanley Marcus and Andrew Goodman, of Neiman Marcus and Bergdorf Goodman, determined what women would buy each season. That was back when nerds weren’t cool and, for some reason, a lady’s coat had to be longer than her skirt. Women who wanted to be fashionable bought the fashions whether they wanted to wear miniskirts or not. Though fashions changed, the primacy of trends didn’t: Until just a few years ago, no self-respecting teenager would have been caught in the wrong denim wash. Part of the fun of watching old movies was seeing the funny old fashions.

Now, most old film fashions look pretty current to me, from Katharine Hepburn’s swishy man-tailored pants in 1940’s “Philadelphia Story” to those skinny ski-lodge capris in 1963’s “The Pink Panther.”

“Trends are diluted,” says Doris Raymond, owner of the Los Angeles vintage store The Way We Wore. That’s because designers have in the past two decades “referenced every possible fashion period for inspiration.”

The style consensus has been splintering for nearly a decade as workplaces have grown more casual and fields like tech have pursued their own tribal dress codes. Meanwhile, young celebrities have championed a mix-and-match aesthetic. “The industry is fragmenting, reflecting consumers’ desire to create their own style,” says Marie Driscoll, director of consumer discretionary retail coverage for Standard & Poor’s equity research.

Retailers like Zara, H&M and Forever 21 have contributed to “fast fashion,” gobbling their way through looks. Last week in New York, H&M sale racks displayed blurry-print floral blouses based on designer looks that were shown on the runways in September. When those designers’ own clothes arrive in stores in March, H&M customers may well view the originals with déjà vu. Runway looks are now accessible to everyone—but their cachet disappears a lot faster.

I welcome democratic fashion as one of the many benefits of being alive in 2010. But it can be a headache for the fashion industry, which once could depend on trends to lure customers and still maintains a trend-spotting infrastructure to figure out who will buy what. Predicting trends is “more challenging every year,” says Sharon Graubard, a trend analyst with fashion consultancy Stylesight. “With fewer ‘must-have’ items, retailers and designers have to try harder,” she says.

Some new retailers are letting customers dictate the details. “Fashion has traditionally been this top-down industry, but we saw that technology” could allow consumers to choose their own details, says Abby Holtz, director of marketing for indiCustom, a San Francisco retailer of custom jeans and shirts that launched in 2008. Its IndiDenim brand lets shoppers pick fabric, leg shape, pockets and other details for customized jeans.

But there’s one fashion segment where trend is increasingly dominant: menswear, where pleats are “out” and trim, flat-front pants are “in,” says Andy Gilchrist, author of “The Encyclopedia of Men’s Clothes” and founder of the “Ask Andy” Web site. “It seems,” he says, “that the designers and retailers are trying to get men into that ‘old’ women’s fashion trend cycle.”